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A new shiny Scotland – Part 4

04 Feb

As the title would suggest this is a utopian view of how a new Scotland following a successful YES vote in the independence referendum “could” develop. If you haven’t read Part 1 it’s here, Part 2 is here and part 3 is here.

So carrying on our tale.

An odd things also happened with the Scottish economy. Before independence we were told that 40% of our exports went to EU countries. The actual truth was a bit lower but since independence it’s increased to the equivalent of 45%. But trading with the rest of the world has been incredible. The number of trading agreements and the opening up of new partnerships with countries overseas has been significant. Lots of foreign countries have been opening up bases and building manufacturing plants. The port at Greenock is beginning to strain significantly and Aberdeen, Edinburgh and Grangemouth are booming. It’s so good to see the rivers back in use.

There have also been lots of ferries and hovercraft services introduced on the Clyde, the Tay and the Forth. Glasgow airport now has a proper train station and both Edinburgh and Glasgow airports are having additional runways built. Tourism is booming as never before.

Scottish football hasn’t done so well. There is plenty of investment happening and promising youngsters have been spotted and are going to special schools, which allows them to learn football and hone their skills. Similar things are happening in other sports and the arts.

The huge reduction of laws and regulations has made a lot easier for everyone. Loads of laws were scrapped and people’s rights have really escalated again. For example people can sing what they want at football matches and they can have a drink while they are there. SFA stewards now provide security at matches although there is always a small police presence for those who either can’t behave or have a “moment”.

Localism has been a great benefit and it’s sorted out a lot of issues. Very few towns and just a few areas in cities have parking regulations. People try to shop locally which has supported a huge leap in small individual specialty shops opening. High streets are becoming different again, not the same old no matter wherever you go.

The move towards local democracy continues and will do so until each local area council has reduced to a size, which supports the area in a very efficient manner. The same is happening with the police, fire services, NHS, etc. and the costs of councils is dropping also. In times gone by the mantra was to get bigger to achieve economies of scale but this was never realised. Small is better and the costs have fallen. There are some larger procurement groups that buy in bulk but in the main costs are kept down by the local councils themselves.

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